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Load testing to ASHRAE TC9.9

Posted By Paul Smethurst, Hillstone Products, 28 October 2015

ASHRAE TC9.9 promotes operating IT equipment at higher ambient temperatures to reduce the running costs of datacentre cooling systems.

In order to incorporate these recommendations datacentre designers and operators need to be able to replicate maximum expected environmental conditions during IST commissioning programs. 

TC9.9 defines two temperature criteria which must be part of any IST commissioning program. 

-       The first criteria being the cold aisle operating temperature range of 18°C - 27°C  /  64°F - 80°F

-       The second criteria defines the maximum operating temperature of 40°C -45°C / 104°F - 113°F for commercial grade IT equipment

Often commissioning managers complain of load banks cutting out due to temperature overload thermostats and subsequent difficulties of establishing a consistent temperature in the datahall when trying to meet the temperature range of testing to TC9.9. 

These load banks will therefore prevent the IST from demonstrating failure of the cooling system and the time period for the temperature rise to reach the maximum operating temperature for commercial grade IT equipment.

Hillstone’s HAC230-6RM server simulator load banks are designed to operate in accordance to TC9.9 over a wide temperature range to prove the successful operation of the datacentre during stress testing of the HVAC system.   

This includes:

-       operating the cold aisle at  18°C - 27°C  /  64°F - 80°F

-       determining the runtime to 40-45°C / 104°F - 113°F

-       creating a delta T range from 6°C to 20°C  / 43°F - 64°F

 

Hillstone datacentre services can supply the 6RM from its UK & Middle East rental depots

 

The Hillstone load bank and IST package will allow IT managers to build SOP and staff training programs the for mission critical equipment

 

Contact Hillstone Datacentre Services

www.hillstone.co.uk

sales@hillstone.co.uk

Tel +44 161 763 3100

 

Tags:  Cooling  power 

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Why Knowledge is Power

Posted By Stephen Hall, Ark Data Centres Limited, 21 July 2015

At Crown Hosting Data Centres we believe that knowledge is power. It’s the reason why we give all our public sector customers comprehensive infrastructure reporting on every aspect of their data centre operation.

Delivered in a dashboard format, these monthly Management Information (MI) reports are packed with insights into the efficiency and performance of your data centre –it’s a bit like a detailed breakdown on everything from equipment capacity, availability and loading, to the amount of power consumed by cabinet.

All of this delivers significant advantages for every agency or department we work with, regardless of size - especially when it comes to demonstrating carbon savings.

As you’d expect, Crown Hosting Data Centre agreements come with a huge number of environmental considerations already built-in.

For example, all Crown Hosting Data Centres employ the best of breed energy efficiency technologies that deliver compliance with the HMG Greening Government ICT strategy and EU directives for all our government and public sector customers.

And of course, all Crown Data Centre contracts come with a fixed power usage effectiveness (PUE) rating that at a stroke minimises your power utilisation by 50% compared to industry norms.

But with detailed MI at your fingertips, the theoretical at last becomes measurable and tangible.

So you can see exactly what level of reliability you’re getting, how much energy you’re consuming, and get a sense of what equipment isn’t being optimised – so you can take the decision to switch off what’s not needed or being used.

Armed with powerful MI, you’ll be able to hit green targets while lowering costs, and increasing scalability.

Indeed, some of the organisations using Crown Hosting Data Centres today tell us they’ve seen a two-thirds cost saving against their previous cost base. Less power usage equates to less carbon - and that’s good for everyone.

Tags:  crown hosting  Datacentre  dc operations  hosting  knowledge  power 

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Would you buy a pair of shoes that were made in a factory or from a ‘cobbler’

Posted By Paul Russell, Vertiv, 13 February 2015
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUGKndg87m8

  Have You Ever Considered a Modular Data Center?

 

At a recent internal meeting I proposed the question: Would you buy a pair of shoes that were made in a factory or from a ‘cobbler’ (e.g. independent craftsman)? Needless to say, this caused some hilarity amongst my colleagues, but the question has been applied to all forms of consumer goods ever since the 1850’s from baked beans to cars. The answer is – it depends and it could go either way based on the need for customization or preference of hand-made goods. When goods are made by a group of experts carrying out repetitive tasks, in a controlled environment, they are usually less expensive to produce and the product quality is consistent. For hand-crafted goods, your shoes for example, you might have slight variations and they may be more expensive because of the time and personal attention needed to hand-craft them.  This analogy is reflective of the choices CIOs have when deciding whether to start from scratch in building a data center or to choose a modular solution.

In both cases learning, training and experience are always necessary.

Advantages of choosing modular

In fact, data centres have been made in a modular format for a number of years, from a number of vendors, as there are many attractive advantages. But let’s define modular first: “A manufacturing construction method to enable quick assembly of a complete structure, complete with all its services, in sections, within a controlled environment, that is then relocated to its permanent location”.

Normally the fabric for technical buildings is steel, but many fabrics can be used.

So why modular?

1. Build Speed – maybe this is the most attractive feature for clients. In fact, the modules can be designed, fabricated, assembled, fitted out and wired (both electrically and with communications cabling) while the foundations are being constructed on the client’s site. Air conditioning and electrical systems are all included and wired. Modules can even be fitted with toilets and just bolted together on site. Think about it!  – A project build that is no longer affected by weather or dependant on gangs of tradespeople all working together in a small space to achieve the end goal.

2. Quality – No longer is the quality of a project dependant on gangs of people who have never worked together before and who have never co-ordinated their functions before.

3. Fixed Price – Once the project is defined and agreed upon, the price can be agreed. The components are known, the build time is defined, transport costs are calculated and the client has a fixed price, a big advantage over a traditional build where many factors can affect the timeline of a build and therefore the final costs.

In fact there is another cost advantage with a modular build, if you are unsure of the size or capacity of your prospective data centre. With the ‘add-on’ approach, and the appropriate design, you can add modules to an existing build as your demand grows over time. So it is common for each module to be equipped with electrical distribution, that “plugs in” to the main system, independent standalone cooling systems, all with redundancy built in.

Each module can be equipped with the latest security features so that each module can be managed or staffed by independent organisations. Providing the cooling and electrical systems are identical, the site maintenance provider can service and “fault find” outside of the data space, if that is the design, on an individual module with ease.

Of course, vendors such as Emerson know their products and can incorporate all the latest technological techniques into a build and with one of the world’s largest teams of technical personnel, any client special requirements can be designed and delivered. So telephone exchanges, sub stations, combined UPS and generator enclosures, Solar Power transfer stations, cable distribution hubs, temporary data processing modules and even portable buildings are all possible.

Tier structures and PUe (or other metrics) can easily be designed into a modular system and it is much easier to modify or change parameters to amend PUe in a small module rather than a large hall. Using the modular build approach, almost anything is possible. So if you need a generator within the build, or a DC supply for your solar farm, or a telephone exchange and then want to combine this with a concrete render, or a terracotta tile exterior, flat roof, tiled roof, metal roof any combination is achievable. Even workshops and offices can be incorporated, complete with chairs desks and coffee machines!

But maybe the biggest benefit of a modular construction is the fact that it can be built at the factory, then tested and signed off by the client before his foundations are completed! Remember that this is with all the racks wired (in the case of a data centre) all the cooling or fresh air units working.  Offsite testing must be the biggest selling point you see what you get and prove it before it leaves the factory.

However it should be noted that modular cannot fit every situation. The main constraints are transport costs together with transport size and weight constraints. The cheapest form of transport (in the EU) is the standard 24 tonne three axle trailer forming the 40 tonne articulated truck. Within the EU directive 96/53/EC provides the relevant data for height and width constraints on the EU road network. As soon as you design a modular section that goes over these constraints the cost increases, as special trucks are required, with special teams to supervise movement. It is also important to obtain the best value for transport money by designing in the best weight and size ratio to a truck load. So if an area within the modular build is empty the best design might be to flat pack the walls, roof and floors, stack them on a truck and assemble them on site, rather than assemble them into four walls and a floor as a rigid construction.

Remember the shoes? Well just think – you try them on in the shop before taking them home! Just like an Emerson modular construction technical building!

Learn more about modular data centers by watching the video of the T-Systems project.

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  Datacentre  Date Centre  efficiency  Modular  planning  power 

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Nothing Worth Having Comes Easy !

Posted By Steve Hone, 01 August 2012

So your thinking about building a Data Centre are you,.... well how difficult can it be !!!, before you jump in feet first here are a few things to consider................

You dont have to scratch to far under the surface to realise there's a lot that goes into running a data centre- and the logistics can, quite frankly, be overwhelming. Paying attention to the metrics- to all the little details- can make or break a facility. If an Operator isn't careful, they can easily find themselves left in the dust by their competitors. Not surprisingly, there's also a lot that goes into establishing a data centre, as well. If you're thinking of having your business start one up, you need to ask yourselves a few questions first. If you don't, the results could be disastrous.

The Reason:

Why are you setting up a data centre? What do you have to gain from it? If you do set it up, what will you use it for? What sort of services will it provide? Is it going to primarily be used for consumer information, or for business data? What sort of a profit do you stand to make? You need to consider very, very carefully whether or not setting up a data centre is the right choice for you before you do it- and what purpose the facility will serve as it may well prove to be more cost effective to outsource to a Colocation, Hosting or MS/Cloud provider instead.

The Location:

Aside from the purpose of your facility, its location is probably the most important consideration. Will it be a domestic centre, or an international one? What sites are available? What sites best suit your needs? The planned purpose of the facility will have a marked impact on where you situate it.

Cost:

Another question you need to answer before setting up a facility is whether or not you've got the budget to do so. How much will your data centre cost? What sort of upkeep will be required to keep things running? What about power demands? You're going to need to budget everything very, very carefully before you set up your new facility- plan out how much money it'll make you, and compare that against how much it's slated to cost you.

While there are certain steps you can take to reduce the cost of running the facility- such as greener energy and hardware alternatives- you still need to be certain the new centre won't break the bank.

Employees and staffing:

What sort of outside help will you be bringing in to help set up the data centre? Are your employees properly trained to manage such a facility? Can your IT department handle the Cloud? Do you have the staff base to manage things now, or are you going to need to bring in new hires in order to handle the workload?

Space:

Space is another of your concerns- before you go about purchasing your hardware, figure out how much space you need- and then how much space you've got. If you've done your homework and found a good location, those two variables should be pretty much the same. Consider the options you have for reducing how much space your server takes up- new, compact modular server designs are just one of these options.

The Hardware and Equipment:

You're going to need to figure out where you're getting your hardware from, and what sort of hardware you'll need. Be sure to buy new- skimping on the servers is one of the worst possible things you can do. More than anything else, you'll need your hardware to be both durable and reliable. Go for those qualities first, and consider innovative solutions as secondary concerns.

Hardware's not the only thing you'll need to worry about, either. You'll need equipment aside from the servers- server racks and office supplies are one example, and if you're constructing the facility from the ground up, you'll need to consider the supplies you'll need to build it, as well.

Cooling:

How are you going to keep your servers running cool? While the traditional approach works just fine, it has a tendency to rack up a downright terrifying power bill- consider more innovative alternatives.

Network Connectivity:

This should really go without saying. What sort of network provider are you going to be making a deal with? How much bandwidth is your facility going to need? How much will it cost? Can the physical infrastructure of your facility and the surrounding area keep up? You need to make sure you've got the right provider and hardware for your network, or your clients are going to be experiencing a great deal of latency- which could ultimately cripple your centre.

The Software:

You're also going to need to iron out the details of your software. What sort of management platform are you going to use? Will you be dealing with a vendor, or developing your own in-house platform? If you're choosing a vendor, make sure you choose a good one-

Power:

Finally, how much energy will your data centre use? What will the power efficiency of the facility be? How can you improve on this efficiency? How much power should you provision for the facility? Make sure you've got this ironed out in advance- it'll cost you a very, very large sum if you end up having to reprovision.

 

 

 

 

Many thanks to Nicholas Greene

Tags:  budget  building  central  comms  cooling  data  Date Centre  Location  planning  power 

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